Tag Archives: september 1st

September 1st Survival Guide

Boston September 1st

If you’ve never been in Boston on September 1st, congratulations on avoiding what I’d call a circus except that would be a disservice to circuses! To say that the city is a chaotic mess is an understatement of epic (fail) proportions and if you can avoid it you should do so at all costs. This year the first is a Friday, which means the craziness may be less intense on THE day because some of the folks leaving the city started moving out as early as last Saturday and those coming from out of town with all their stuff will likely be spread out across the long weekend. What follows are some tips to make life easier for those of you who AREN’T moving…

  • If you live in a part of Greater Boston with on-street parking and you have a parking space on Thursday night, DON’T MOVE YOUR CAR UNTIL TUESDAY! There will be many, many moving vans and extra cars on the streets through the 5th of September, and if you give up an on-street spot, the odds of getting it (or any space near it) back are minimal. Also, when you park your car, think about doing so on a side street if possible. Yes, it may be a little further from your front door but all those extra cars on the main streets are likely to lead to a lot more dings and dents than usual.
  • Regardless of where you park, avoid driving in the city if you can. It’s the perfect storm of bad driving – people behind the wheel of vehicles (U-Haul’s, moving vans, trucks) they don’t usually drive navigating tricky neighborhoods  they aren’t familiar with – and you don’t want to be stuck behind them. Maybe take public transportation to work for a couple of days and think of it as an adventure!
  • Do your shopping now. While you may just need a few items, all these new people have entire kitchens, pantries, and dorm rooms to stock with food, drinks, and various household items, so supermarkets, Targets, CVS, and Walmart are likely to be overflowing with customers and light on inventory. Stock up now so you don’t have to do battle with someone who’s got two full carts.
  • If you are going out to eat over the long weekend you should stick to locally owned establishments. Again, there will be 10’s of thousands of new-to-the-city folks plus the friends and family that have come to town to help with the move, and those people are much more likely to go with national chain restaurants they are familiar with than the neighborhood places you already know are much better.
topzipcodes

Busiest Zip Codes for September 1st Move-In — Courtesy of RentHop.com

  • Remember, it’s only this bad for the first weekend, and hopefully enough current Bostonian’s will leave town for Labor Day so as to at least somewhat offset the influx of newbies. Sure, traffic is going to be much worse with school back in session (and if you think driving is bad then, wait until the first snow of the season, which for some new Bostonian’s will be the first snow they’ve EVER driven in) but overall things settle down and people start to learn the ins and outs of the city and wrap their heads around the concept that cars in the rotary have the right of way.

This post was written by Al Norton, Rental Manager


Al NortonAl Norton is in his 14th year as the Rental Manager at Unlimited Sotheby’s International Realty and his 23rd year working in the Greater Boston housing market.
You can speak to Al at 617.699.3811 or al.norton@unlimitedsir.com

September 1st Survival Guide

Sept1st-01

If you’ve never been in Boston on September 1st, congratulations on avoiding what I’d call a circus except that would be a disservice to circuses! To say that the city is a chaotic mess is an understatement of epic (fail) proportions and if you can avoid it you should do so at all costs. This year the First is a Thursday, which means the craziness may be less intense on THE day because folks leaving the city, they will start moving as early as Saturday, August 27th, and for those coming from out of town, they may wait until the long weekend to hit the town with their stuff. What follows are some tips to make life easier for those of you who AREN’T moving…

  • If you live in a part of Greater Boston with on-street parking and you have a parking space on the weekend of the 27th, DON’T MOVE YOUR CAR FOR A WEEK. There will be many, many moving vans and extra cars over through the 5th of September, and if you give up an on-street spot, the odds of getting it (or any space near it) back are minimal. Also, when you park your car, think about doing so on a side street if possible. Yes, it may be a little further from your front door but all those extra cars on the main streets are likely to lead to a lot more dings and dents than usual.
  • Regardless of where you park, avoid driving in the city if you can. It’s the perfect storm of bad driving – people behind the wheel of vehicles (U-Haul’s, moving vans, trucks) they don’t usually drive navigating tricky neighborhoods  they aren’t familiar with – and you don’t want to be stuck behind them. Maybe take public transportation to work for a couple of days and think of it as an adventure!

    Courtesy of Boston Magazine

    Moving Truck Permit Heat Map – Courtesy of Boston Magazine

  • Do your shopping now. While you may just need a few items, all these new people have entire kitchens, pantries, and dorm rooms to stock with food, drinks, and various household items, so supermarkets, Targets, CVS, and Walmart are likely to be overflowing with customers and light on inventory. Stock up now so you don’t have to do battle with someone who’s got two full carts.
  • If you are going out to eat over the long weekend you should stick to locally owned establishments. Again, there will be 10’s of thousands of new-to-the-city folks plus the friends and family that have come to town to help with the move, and those people are much more likely to go with national chain restaurants they are familiar with than the neighborhood places you already know are much better.
  • Remember, it’s only this bad for the first weekend, and hopefully enough current Bostonian’s will leave town for Labor Day so as to at least somewhat offset the influx of newbies. Sure, traffic is going to be much worse with school back in session (and if you think driving is bad then, wait until the first snow of the season, which for some new Bostonian’s will be the first snow they’ve EVER driven in) but overall things settle down and people start to learn the ins and outs of the city and wrap their heads around the concept that cars in the rotary have the right of way.
This post was written by: Al Norton, Rental Manager

Al NortonAl Norton is in his 12th year as the Rental Manager at Unlimited Sotheby’s International Realty and his 20th year working in the Greater Boston housing market.
You can speak to Al at 617.699.3811 or al.norton@unlimitedsir.com

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September 1st Survival Guide

moving day

If you’ve never been in Boston on September 1st, congratulations on avoiding what I’d call a circus except that would be a disservice to circuses! To say that the city is a chaotic mess is an understatement of epic (fail) proportions and if you can avoid it you should do so. This year the 1st is a Tuesday, which means the craziness may be less intense on THE day because it will be spread out over FOUR days (folks will start moving out on Saturday the 29th). What follows are some tips to make life easier for those of you who AREN’T moving…

  • If you live in a part of Greater Boston with on-street parking and you have a parking space on Friday night, DON’T MOVE YOUR CAR UNTIL WEDNESDAY. There will be many, many moving vans and extra cars over those four days and if you give up an on-street spot, the odds of getting it (or any space near it) back are minimal. Also, when you park your car, think about doing so on a side street if possible. Yes, it may be a little further from your front door but all those extra cars on the main streets are likely to lead to a lot more dings and dents than usual.
  • Regardless of where you park, avoid driving in the city until Wednesday. It’s the perfect storm of bad driving – people behind the wheel of vehicles (U-Haul’s, moving vans, trucks) they don’t usually drive navigating tricky neighborhoods they aren’t familiar with – and you don’t want to be stuck behind them. Maybe take public transportation to work for a couple of days and think of it as an adventure!
  • Do your shopping now. While you may just need a few items, all these new people have entire kitchens, pantries, and dorm rooms to stock with food, drinks, and various household items, so supermarkets, home stores and more are likely to be overflowing with customers and light on inventory. Stock up now so you don’t have to do battle with someone who’s got two full carts.
  • If you are going out to eat over the weekend you should stick to locally owned establishments. Again, there will be 10’s of thousands of new-to-the-city folks plus the friends and family that have come to town to help with the move, and those people are much more likely to go with national chain restaurants they are familiar with than the neighborhood places you already know are much better.
  • Remember, it’s only this bad for the first weekend. Next weekend is Labor Day, so there will be a lot of people leaving town, which will calm things down a bit. Sure, traffic is going to be much worse with school back in session (and if you think driving is bad then, wait until the first snow of the season, which for some new Bostonian’s will be the first snow they’ve EVER driven in) but overall things settle down and people start to learn the ins and outs of the city and wrap their heads around the concept that cars in the rotary have the right of way.
This post was written by: Al Norton, Rental Manager

Al NortonAl Norton is in his 12th year as the Rental Manager at Unlimited Sotheby’s International Realty and his 20th year working in the Greater Boston housing market. You can speak to Al at 617.699.3811 or al.norton@unlimitedsir.com

Featured Rental: 2014 Renovated 3 Bed in Brookline Village

kitchenExt Front Ext LR

 

Exclusive Listing – Rice Street, Brookline Village

$2875/month, Available September 1st.

This 1200 sq.ft. 3 bed, 2 bath apartment was gut renovated in 2014, including a granite/stainless kitchen, modern baths, hardwood floors throughout, and all new heating/electrical, and plumbing systems. A private patio off the back of the unit that was built earlier this summer. Laundry is in the basement and rental parking is available next door. Close to stores, restaurants, multiple parks, the Lincoln Elementary school as well as Brookline High School, Jamaica Pond, and T and bus lines.

Learn more, contact our rental departments at:
617.264.7900 (Brookline) or 617.522.2200 (JP), rentals@unlimitedsir.com

It’s Almost September 1st & You Haven’t Found an Apartment/Tenants Yet?!

As we approach July 15th, just about six weeks until the biggest move-in day of the year in Greater Boston, here’s what you need to know…
Apt4RentIf You’re a Landlord

Our standard advice is to list 8-10 weeks before occupancy, and that means the ideal deadline for a 9/1 apartment has already come and gone. Does this mean it’s not going to rent? Of course not, and you’re quite likely looking at an increase from your previous rent. However, keep in mind that there will be less people looking two weeks from now then there are now, and so on and so on, making this not a good time to take the “list at outrageous rent and terms and then come down if nothing happens” approach. Just remember that while the market is still in your favor, there is a faint ticking clock that’s only going to get louder.

If You’re a Renter

See above. The rental timelines are the same – people should be looking no less than 8-10 weeks before they want to move in. If you’re looking for a 9/1 apartment now, you may need to be more flexible than usual. Before you begin looking, set your list of priorities to make the process go faster and smoother (e.g., price, location, # of bedrooms).

Also, don’t waste time looking at places that you know aren’t a good fit just to see them. If you really can come up $200 in rent, or live with no parking, or can take the bus instead of the T, great, let’s go see the place right now! Otherwise save your time and energy for places that are actually a potential new home for you.

I know some renters think they may have an hand-101003advantage because it’s getting close to September 1st, and while it is true that the big deadline is approaching for everyone, landlords aren’t anywhere near desperate because they still know there are more of you then there are of them and also because given your choice of worst case scenarios, everyone would chose having an empty apartment over not having any apartment at all. This means if you are going to try to negotiate a deal, be smart about it and pick one thing (price, deposits, move-in date, fees). Also, if you don’t have great credit and/or you need a co-signer, you’re not really in a position to negotiate since accepting your application in the first place is in and of itself a negotiation.

If You Are Either

Both parties need to remember that this is the START of a short term relationship – unlike on the sales side where your decisions can be more long term – so you want to project as low-maintenance an image as possible. Remembering that this process can be stressful for everyone will be a good way to get things off on the right foot.

Al-new cropped

 

Al Norton, Rental Manager, Prudential Unlimited Realty
Al Norton can be reached at 617-669-3811 or rentals@prudentialunlimited.com