Hidden Gem: The Bonsai Collection

IMG_0103A trip to the Arnold Arboretum is not complete unless you visit the Larz Anderson Collection of Japanese Bonsai Trees. Located approximately 10 minutes from the Arborway Main Entrance is a beautiful wooden structure that houses 35 bonsai trees.

This collection of Japanese Bonsai Trees at the Arnold Arboretum in Jamaica Plain was originally imported into the United States by Larz Anderson in 1913, after his return from serving as ambassador to Japan. When Anderson died in 1937, his wife Isabel Anderson donated the majority of their bonsai collection (30 plants) to the Arnold Arboretum. When Isabel died in 1949 the rest of the collection came to the Arboretum. The core of the collection consists of 6 bonsai that are between 150 and 275 years old.  Since the donation of the original collection additional bonsai have been added for a total of 35 trees.

In Japan, the cultivation of Bonsai dates back 1,000 years. With the use of techniques such as pruning, root reduction, defoliation, and grafting, bonsai growers create attractive miniature trees identical in shape and style to full-size trees.

Normally bonsai can be left outdoors all winter with minimal protection but with New England’s severe climate the plants need to be protected. During the winter months the plants are stored in a concrete-block structure. The plants go into cold storage in November and come out in mid-April.

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The collection is on view daily from 8 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. from mid April through mid November, excluding holidays.

 Source: The Arnold Arboretum
Photos: Angela Mark