EXPLORE: Living in Cambridge, Massachusetts

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As one of the most sought-after places in greater Boston to reside, Cambridge has ample charm to go along with its history and intellectual fame. First established when America was still under British rule, it has aged so gracefully that its ivory towers and historical churches blend seamlessly with its thriving science and technology hubs. Combine all of these perks with easy access to the Hub of the Universe and Cambridge becomes a city almost unbeatable in its desirability.

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Cambridge is most distinguishable on a global scale for being the home of multiple top universities. Harvard University, established a year after Cambridge itself, is America’s first established university and needs no further introduction at the top of the Ivy League and the world’s most prestigious institutions. Its intimate ties with Cambridge shines best with the ample amount of cultural, scientific, and artistic museums and events available to the public.

A mere five-minute subway ride from Harvard lies the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, whose specialties in STEM education has brought a slew of advancements for the world at large. MIT’s focus on innovation has left its mark on Cambridge in everything from its quirky architecture to proffered programs and collections available for viewing.

As if two of the most prominent educational institutions weren’t enough, Cambridge packs itself with more academic power in schools including Lesley University and Hult International Business School. This amount of college-educated professionals serves the greater Boston area well, securing its place as one of the most educated metro areas in the country.

Attractions

Steeped in colonial history, Cambridge is a hotbed of historical architecture with residences, churches, and other buildings that stretch back hundreds of years. Highlights include Christ Church on Garden Street, a National Historic Landmark, as well as the Longfellow House on Brattle Street, which served as headquarters for General George Washington before it housed one of America’s greatest poets.

Looking for something a bit more contemporary? There are low-cost events offered daily via Harvard and MIT. Lectures, film screenings, festivals, and more can be found unfolding throughout both campuses. Additionally, their breadth of museums – including the List Visual Arts Center, Harvard Art Museums, and the Harvard Museum of Natural History – provide rotating exhibits and content for all ages to enjoy.

Transportation

Cambridge has several transportation options for visitors and residents: the MBTA offers service on the Green Line, Red Line, and with multiple bus routes that crisscross the city. On the commuter rail, the Porter Square stop connects Cambridge with both Boston and its father western suburbs.

With one in every four Cambridge residents (or 24%) commuting to work on foot, the walking paths and infrastructure are incomparable. With paths along its many squares and the Charles River, it’s no wonder it was named the Best US City for Walking.

Dining and Shopping

It’s earned the nickname “The City of Squares” for a good reason: Cambridge hosts a number of town squares, each with its own personality and mini-culture. Lechmere Square is best known for the Galleria Mall and just steps away from the Museum of Science. Kendall Square, also home to the MIT campus, is known as “the most innovative square mile on the planet” due to the high concentration of start-ups it houses. In contrast, Harvard Square holds court as the historic center of Cambridge. For a square that boasts more ethnic restaurants and live music venues, Central Square is the official Culture District to flock to.

For every square there’s a particular gem that’s a must-visit for both natives and newcomers. Check out the Garment District in Kendall Square after eating at Catalyst. Celebrate your offbeat find from Harvard Square’s Black Ink with a cocktail from the Russell House Tavern. Savor some ice cream at Toscanini’s after picking up a book from Seven Stars in Central Square. No matter your preference, Cambridge has a restaurant and store that’s sure to be your favorite.

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The average price of a single family home is roughly $1.9 million, according to Trendgraphix, making it one of the most expensive markets in the Boston area. Due to its surplus of college students and young professionals, more than sixty five percent of Cambridge units are rented.

Cambridge real estate has historically been highly valued due to its proximity to prestigious universities and to downtown Boston. Its diverse community and extensive opportunities further cement it as a highly attractive location for real estate interests.

To learn more about Cambridge and see the latest listings in the area, click here.